Tag: Curt Swan

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Legion of Super-Heroes Annual #3 – Reviews of Old Comics

It's been long enough that I feel like I can get back to the task that I set for myself back when I last wrote Reviews of Old Comics on a weekly basis, the coverage of the Legion of Super-Heroes in the era that I got hooked on them. This issue is actually one that I didn't read until many years later.  In the 1980s, Annuals were a little harder to come by than they are now. These were the days before comics were exclusively in comic shops. The direct market was still in its infancy, with DC still in the first year of it's line specifically for comic shops. Often, one wouldn't know an Annual was coming out until it was seen on the newsstand or spinner racks. Some vendors might not even carry the Annuals. Many times, the Annuals would be self-contained stories and if it was missed or overlooked, a reader wouldn't even realize it for months.

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Reviews of Old Comics: DC Comics Presents #87

DC COMICS PRESENTS #87 November 1985 For this review, I selected a comic at random, to avoid a pattern developing in my reviews. Which brings us to the last year of DC Comics Presents, where the title crossed over with Crisis on Infinite Earths. DC was in the midst of changing their multiverse forever, and no one knew quite where everything would land. Just before this issue came out, readers of Crisis on Infinite Earths were shocked by the death of Supergirl, and the story flows into this comic, which feature the first appearance of Superboy from Earth Prime! SYNOPSIS: As the Crisis goes on, nature is in chaos affecting nearly everything. Meanwhile, Superman is on the surface of the moon, in a fit of grief over his cousin's death. At that moment, two aliens come flying by, and as operatives of the Superman Revenge Squad, hit Superman with a ray that apparently makes him vanish. Superman comes to his senses on the moon and flies back to Earth, but when he scans it with his telescopic vision realizes that he's been transported to Earth Prime, where all super-heroes are fictional characters. He then witnesses a teenage boy in a Superman costume take off into the sky.

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Reviews of Old Comics: Legion of Super-Heroes #306

LEGION OF SUPER-HEROES #306 December 1983 One of the best costumes in comics has to be Star Boy of the Legion. You know that I’m not referring to his purple and white Silver Age costume, either. The costume I’m referring to is the star field costume with white gloves and boots. Alex Ross kept it

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Reviews of Old Comics: Legion of Super-Heroes #92

LEGION OF SUPER-HEROES #92 May 1997 Legion Of Super-Heroes #92 was a nice little pause middle of a period where my interest in the Legion was beginning to wane. The creators of the time split the team up into two, stranding one in the 20th century where they participated in the "Final Night" crossover and got to interact with just about every hero in the DC Universe. That team got the Legion of Super-Heroes title, while the others left back home in the 30th century carried on in Legionnaires. During this period, Curt Swan who penciled a good many of the Silver Age Legion stories died and this issue was a tribute to him. The striking cover hearkens back to the "alien space monster" theme popular in sci-fi during the late 1950s, where the story is set. That seem like as good a place as any to launch into the story recap, so get ready for some fifties themed monster fun. SUMMARY Mr. Swan, an art teacher in a stereotypical high school, is teaching a group of teens that look suspiciously like our familiar Legionnaires. The names are plays on their alter egos: Rick Crane (Cosmic Boy), Irma Arden (Saturn Girl), Earl Docks (Brainiac 5), Ella Rand (Spark), Joe Knotts (Ultra Boy), Laura, Lorna, and Lauren Dugan (Triplicate Girl), and Sandy Anderson (Inferno, but we never learned her real name). The teens are also members of the school design club who are preparing for a visit by President Eisenhower. On the way home, Joe Knotts true to his young hood nature, hits on the cheerleader Sandy, whose rescued by teen lovebirds Irma and Rick. Joe instead follows the Dugan triplets. Ella thwarts some mushiness between Irma and Rick as Joe observes the Dugans merge in their bedroom using X-Ray Vision, revealing to us that there's something odd about both, uh all four(?) of them.

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