Review: Doctor Who: The Ninth Doctor #1

Christopher Eccleston only had one season as the Doctor, but his incarnation is what re-established a fan base for the next ten years of Doctor Who. Titan Comics has gone back to explore the moments in between the episodic adventures of the Ninth Doctor. For reference, it appears that it falls after the events of “The Doctor Dances,” but could be after “Boom Town.” Nevertheless, this mini-series gives us more of a look at the adventures of the Ninth Doctor and his companions, Rose Tyler and Captain Jack Harkness.

Cover_ADOCTOR WHO: THE NINTH DOCTOR #1

Writer: Cavan Scott
Artist: Blair Shedd
Number of Issues: 1 (of 5)
Publisher: Titan Comics
32 pgs. / $3.99
Release Date: April 1, 2015

Solicitation:

BRAND-NEW 5-PART MINI-SERIES STARRING THE NINTH DOCTOR AS PLAYED BY CHRISTOPHER ECCLESTON!

WRITTEN BY THE CO-AUTHOR OF BESTSELLING ‘WHO-OLOGY’, CAVAN SCOTT!

The Ninth Doctor is BACK with a brand-new miniseries: WEAPONS OF PAST DESTRUCTION!

Leaving World War II behind, The Ninth Doctor, Rose and Captain Jack discover that Time Lord technology, lost in the wake of the Time War, is being sold on the intergalactic black market!

Now the threat of a NEW temporal war brews on the horizon. Can the Doctor stop history repeating itself?

Comes with four covers to collect including a brand-new painted cover by fan-favorite artist Alice X. Zhang!

Doctor_Who_9_1_6Review:

With comics that are based on a television show, the real test for me is if the comics feels like the show. Sometimes they are successful, and sometimes they’re not. Here, it is successful. This has the feel of the television series, although Cavan Scott has a story where the Doctor is taking the lead, whereas much of the first season was about Rose. We get more banter between Captain Jack and the Doctor, which helps develop the doctor since at this point, Jack is more observant than Rose about small things that the Doctor says. Rose serves as the everyman, Jack is the Whovian.

With the art, the element of naturalism in the art works quite well, often giving us renditions of the characters out of screen grabs. If an artist is going for this naturalistic style on a licensed comic, then they better get the likenesses right. Blair Shedd does, and it helps add to the television feel of the comic. It appears from the credits that Shedd also did the color art, although laying down the flat color was Jesse Durona. It’s nice that the color cyan is reserved for unearthly effects, which helps draw our eye to those moments where we’re seeing something fantastic, reminding us that Doctor Who is essentially about something marvelous.

I’ll be there for the rest of this series most likely, and if you’re not a Whovian, maybe just someone with an interest in science fiction, then you can do a lot worse than give this mini-series a chance.