Tag: Alan Moore

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Doomsday Clock #11 – Review

Doomsday Clock was reportedly going to signal the return of the JSA and the Legion of Super-Heroes. Both those teams returned elsewhere this month. That means the purpose of the series now remains to explain how the DC Universe was altered by Dr. Manhattan and essentially be a sequel for Watchmen.

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The British Invasion Now Available From Sequart

Sequart's latest contribution to comics scholarship is The British Invasion: Alan Moore, Neil Gaiman, Grant Morrison, and the Invention of the Modern Comic Book Writer. This is a subject that has been touched on in the past in various outlets for comics journalism, but never comprehensively. The British Invasion looks to be a serious effort to not only tell the story of the early careers of these three writers, but the lasting effect they have had on the comics medium.

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Revisiting Why Dan DiDio Is Wrong

With the hubbub of DC Universe: Rebirth, and the controversy around the apparent inclusion of a hallowed group of characters, I thought it was time to revisit a critique I did of Dan Didio's statements on Before Watchmen. This was posted four years ago, to the date, on my personal blog, before I started writing for this web site. I know that Geoff Johns is the creative force behind Rebirth, but when someone has been as obvious as Didio in orchestrating large events for DC Comics, and he (or she) is in charge, the critique falls equally on his (or her) head.

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Batman: The Killing Joke – Reviews of Old Comics

In light of recent developments that take this story out of DC Continuity, I'm going to depart from my normal practice and actually review an old comic that is still in print. You can go down your local comic shop and probably find a copy at cover price.

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Miracleman – Needless Character Analysis

Almost everyone remembers Miracleman from his 1980s stories by Alan Moore and Neil Gaiman. Because no analysis of the character is complete without an overview of the character's rocky publication history, that is integrated here.

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Top 10 Limited Series of All Time

Because everyone loves Top 10 lists, I'm going to run down my list of my Top 10 limited series of all time. The rules are simple, when published, the series had to have a stated finite number of issues. One-shots are not eligible. I had to have read them, which means this is just my opinion. Everyone clear on the rules?

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Editor’s Choice: Top 5 Batman Stories

Being that it’s Batman month here at Needless Essentials, it’s only appropriate that as Comics editor, I have a list of my favorite 5 Batman stories. In the interest of full disclosure, I really don’t like Batman as a character. He’s been spoiled for too long by writers who forget that he’s supposed to be

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Reviews of Old Comics: Saga of the Swamp Thing #34

SAGA OF THE SWAMP THING #34 March 1985 For many fans my age, we grew up with the writing of Alan Moore. By "growing up" I mean that we literally learned of a new type of storytelling in comics from what he wrote for DC. Watchmen was a lot of people's introduction to his work, but where he was really introduced to America was in the pages of Saga of the Swamp Thing. Alan Moore took a character that was a stereotypical Swamp Monster that was on the path to being another super-hero at DC, albeit a weird one, and developed it into the type of comic that would influence comics for the next 25 years. It helped launch the Vertigo imprint at DC by bringing in readers that wanted more intelligent stories that defied the conventions of the comic book medium. Alan Moore showed us much of what comics are capable of, and at least in the United States, it started with the Swamp Thing. I contemplated starting with the issue where Swamp Thing learns that he is not Alec Holland, just a creature created by the swamp that thinks it used to be Alec Holland, or the annual that rooted Swamp Thing into the magical community of the DC Universe and redefined what that community was all about. Instead I went with an issue that taught me that a comic about a swamp monster could convey emotions other than fear and panic.

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Reviews of Old Comics: Watchmen #1

WATCHMEN #1 September 1986 Watchmen is considered to be one of, if not the best comics of all time. However, it gets seen in today's light as a complete story. A new or casual reader of comics could forget very easily that Watchmen was published in twelve, monthly installments. Since I started reviewing old comics, I've wanted to review some of the stories that are traditionally viewed as the best of the genre. So far, the best comics I've reviewed never show up in lists of the best comics ever. Watchmen has remained in print, much to the spite of Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons, who will regain the rights if DC ever decides to stop publishing it. At this point, I don't know that if they did ever gain the rights, they'd be inclined to do anything with it. Nevertheless, Watchmen remains in the zeitgeist, so I'm going to look at the first issue from a fresh perspective, much like my friends in the ninth grade did when it first came out. I remember my friends Kevin, Todd and Andre pouring over Watchmen, realizing that it was something special. Unfortunately, after that summer, I moved away and didn't pick up Watchmen again until years later, when I bought it in TPB form, a copy I still have today, a first printing that is well read, stained and dog-eared.

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