Category: Reviews of Old Comics

post image

Reviews of Old Comics: Minimum Wage #2

Minimum Wage #2 1995 A little while ago, I wrote a review for Bob Fingerman's sequel to Minimum Wage, currently being published by Image. At the time, I meant to post my old review from my old Blogger site for an issue of the first Minimum Wage. Well, here it is, and changed a little bit for the time passage to today. This is a "Mature Readers" title, so any of you that are younger shouldn't be able to buy this. Sometimes, you'll find this titled listed as "adult," but this particular issue is labeled as "Mature Readers." In the case of this issue, that means profanity, nudity and adult situations. I keep my copies of Minimum Wage on a spinner rack I traded a drawing for about ten years ago.  As always, at least until I can get around to making a banner that says it, spoilers abound. SYNOPSIS: Rob is moving out of his apartment into a new place that he'll share with his girlfriend, Sylvia. His roommate Jack isn't helping, possibly out of some passive-aggressive resentment of Rob's leaving. Rob's annoying friend Matt shows up to pick through Rob's collection of comics and videos and be generally loud and annoying.

Read More →

post image

Reviews of Old Comics: Legion of Super-Heroes 308

LEGION OF SUPER-HEROES #308 February 1984 I’m continuing my reviews of old Legion comics from the period that I started regularly buying Legion of Super-Heroes. This was a string of a few issues that fell a little flat, but the momentum was fortunately strong enough to lead into Volume 3, the Baxter series, which had a

Read More →

post image

Reviews of Old Comics: Sensational She-Hulk #5

Sensational She-Hulk #5 September 1989 Sitting on my computer desktop are two pages from an early issue of Sensational She-Hulk #5. I I briefly touched on them in my review for the issue where she joined the Fantastic Four. SYNOPSIS: She-Hulk is relaxing at home on a Saturday morning after a jog around Central Park. She turns on cartoons to find them changing into realistic displays on traditional cartoon violence and interactions. One click actually transports her into a prehistoric jungle where she rescues a young boy from a Tyrannosaur. The little boy relates that his situation is similar to hers and they deduce that they are in a realistic depiction of the prehistoric cartoon "The Stonesteins." She-Hulk still has her remote control so she presses the button to change the channel and the pair find themselves in a sci-fi setting. Observed by a duck-like assistant to the villainous Doctor Bong who is using a device called an "Educational Recalibration Field." Doctor Bong is determined to locate the source of the disruption and begins scanning for She-Hulk.

Read More →

post image

Reviews of Old Comics: New Mutants #18

New Mutants #18 August 1984 New Mutants #18 was the beginning of a new artist on the Mutant books, Bill Sienkiewicz, who had made a mark on Moon Knight and a few other books. This was a real turn, as Marvel's style was far from artsy, and the comics industry was still recovering from the heavy influence of Neal Adams. Sienkiewicz had developed a style that was based on Illustration and it showed in page layouts that, looking back, set the stage for the modern age manner of irregular panel shapes, overlapping images, and borderless panels. I remember as a twelve-thirteen year-old young artist being blown away by this new style to my comics, and was instantly drawn to it. For Christmas of 1984, I actually copied a panel from this comic and used mixed media to make a Christmas present. SYNOPSIS: We open on New Mutant team leader Dani Moonstar having a terrible nightmare of the Demon Bear that killed her parents. We then see the X-Mansion under attack by the military as a young, red-haired girl uses her powers to shield herself as she makes her way to Professor X trying to reason with the troops telepathically only to be killed. It's revealed that these are the memories of a young woman from the future, the girl from the before, just older, and looking much more ragged. The New Mutants, except Dani and Illyana Rasputin training in the Danger Room, and proving successful, even with some difficulty. Illyana answers the front door to find the red-haired young woman who runs off in tears since she remembers seeing Illyana die.

Read More →

post image

Reviews of Old Comics: Legion of Super-Heroes #307

LEGION OF SUPER-HEROES #307 January 1984 I’m continuing my reviews of old Legion comics from the period that I started regularly buying Legion of Super-Heroes. This was also the time I started really collecting comics, so I think it’s a great starting point for learning what good comics really are. However, it didn’t always hit

Read More →

post image

Reviews of Old Comics: Fantastic Four #265

Fantastic Four #265 April 1984 Sitting on my computer desktop are two pages from an early issue of Sensational She-Hulk. I won't saw which issue they're from, since I plan on making that a review very soon. In the set-up for that review, I figured I should go to the moment that I realized her potential, when she joined the Fantastic Four. SYNOPSIS: The Trapster parachutes onto the roof of the Baxter Building, in an attempt to prove himself by taking out the Fantastic Four on his own. From his point of view we see the Baxter Building layout as he descends through the levels of the Fantastic Four's headquarters, oblivious to the fact that the building's computer defenses are tracking him keeping him from sensitive areas and jamming his paste gun. As he enters the residential level, he realizes that the Fantastic Four aren't home and he's being beaten by an empty building. Spooked by Franklin's caretaker robot, he trips on one of Franklin's toys, barely making his way to the elevator to the lobby, where he's defeated by their android receptionist Roberta, who calls the police to come pick him up.

Read More →

post image

Reviews of Old Comics: Deadpool #1

Deadpool #1 August 1993 Deadpool has taken over the web site, so I feel compelled to review at least one Deadpool comic. I have to admit, I've never really liked the character. He doesn't seem to have a direction and the humor I've seen is a little too random, and scattershot. Naturally, since I don't collect Deadpool, I had to search one out. I really wanted to review one of his earlier appearances in X-Force, but couldn't find one. Instead, I'm going for the very first comic titled Deadpool, a four-issue  mini-series referred to by the story-line's name, The Circle Chase. I've never really read it, so it's new to me, and I suspect, a far cry from today's Deadpool comics. SYNOPSIS: Deadpool is in Sarajevo being stalked by a group of mercenaries, but gets the drop on them and knocks them out, insulting them the entire time. He strides off, regretting that Tolliver has died, since the mercenary business just isn't the same without him. He meets his contact, named Weasel, whom he catches up on his situation, that anyone who ever worked for Tolliver, Deadpool included has a target on their back. He grills weasel for information on Vanessa (aka Copycat) just as Weapon X enters the room to take Deadpool down.

Read More →

post image

Reviews of Old Comics: Samuree #1

SAMUREE #1 May 1987 Writer: Neal Adams Pencils: Mark Beachum Inks: Ian Akin & Brian Garvey Colors: Liz Berube Letters: Ken Bruzenak Lately I've been on a run of reviewing DC Comics. So I went through my comics looking for something to review that wasn't by DC. My last comic was one of the best comics ever published, so I decided to go with something a little more underrated. Enter the world of Neal Adams's Continuity Comics. In 1987 I was getting back into comics after a brief period of abandoning them in an attempt to get girls to like me. Yeah, if I could go back in time, I probably would tell that kid to get over it, life gets better after High School. Nevertheless, my only outlet at first was a convenience store with a spinner rack that let me get reacquainted with the X-Men, and discover a few new titles, including Samuree. SYNOPSIS: Daryl Sheppard, a sixteen year old girl, alias Samuree is training exceptionally hard, but not being noticed by Lieutenant Pierce, with whom apparently she is in love  and practically throwing herself at him. He reads in a newspaper about a hijacking that led into a hostage situation in a natural history museum. Meanwhile, three young superheroes working out also notice the same newspaper article and recognize a name among one of the hostages.

Read More →

post image

Reviews of Old Comics: Watchmen #1

WATCHMEN #1 September 1986 Watchmen is considered to be one of, if not the best comics of all time. However, it gets seen in today's light as a complete story. A new or casual reader of comics could forget very easily that Watchmen was published in twelve, monthly installments. Since I started reviewing old comics, I've wanted to review some of the stories that are traditionally viewed as the best of the genre. So far, the best comics I've reviewed never show up in lists of the best comics ever. Watchmen has remained in print, much to the spite of Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons, who will regain the rights if DC ever decides to stop publishing it. At this point, I don't know that if they did ever gain the rights, they'd be inclined to do anything with it. Nevertheless, Watchmen remains in the zeitgeist, so I'm going to look at the first issue from a fresh perspective, much like my friends in the ninth grade did when it first came out. I remember my friends Kevin, Todd and Andre pouring over Watchmen, realizing that it was something special. Unfortunately, after that summer, I moved away and didn't pick up Watchmen again until years later, when I bought it in TPB form, a copy I still have today, a first printing that is well read, stained and dog-eared.

Read More →

post image

Reviews of Old Comics: Legion of Super-Heroes #306

LEGION OF SUPER-HEROES #306 December 1983 One of the best costumes in comics has to be Star Boy of the Legion. You know that I’m not referring to his purple and white Silver Age costume, either. The costume I’m referring to is the star field costume with white gloves and boots. Alex Ross kept it

Read More →

post image

Reviews of Old Comics: Legion of Super-Heroes #29

LEGION OF SUPER-HEROES #305 November 1983 NOTE: This is a update of one of my reviews of old comics from a blogger account I set up some time ago. I'm reposting it here to make this website the repository for all of my reviews. It has been updated to be as current as possible. Legion Of Super-Heroes #26 was the middle of a period where I was really into the Legion. A lot of people speak bad about the Giffen/Bierbaum period, but I really enjoyed it, as well as the friends I had at the time. At this point, Giffen was working on a ton of stuff at DC, so the art chores had been taken over by Jason Pearson, a newcomer at the time, who'd done some work at Innovation. Later, Pearson would go on to create Body Bags and work on a few other comics as well. SYNOPSIS: The Dominator controlled Android B.I.O.N. has attacked Laurel Gand, who's been covertly monitoring the situation on Dominator controlled Earth as Celeste Rockfish, another Legionnaire. Their battle is destructive and seemingly futile for Laurel, , and when it starts to endanger civilians, she takes it outside the city.

Read More →

post image

Reviews of Old Comics: Twilight #1

TWILIGHT #1 (December) 1990 Twilight #1 was a prestige format book, the first in a series of three books by author Howard Chaykin, famous for the 80s independent comic American Flagg, and Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez, who'd done a lot of work for DC over the course of the 1980s, even having the mass-marketed Superman image for the late 1980s. My friend Joel first exposed me to this book and for the better part of eight years, I sought to complete my own collection of all three books. Being square-bound, they usually sit on my bookshelf, which probably isn't good for their longevity, but who cares, they're just comics. SYNOPSIS: It's the future, and elderly Homer Glint, while chasing after his seeing-eye cat, comes across momentos of his past. The story begins during a hostage crisis in the jungle, where bio-engineered animal men are holed up with the journalistic adventurer team known as the Star-Rovers while military hero John Starker prepares a commando team to storm in and rescue the hostages. Tempers flare in the hut, when Rick Purvis goes nuts after learning that teammate Karel Sorenson has had a sexual relationship with one of the ape men, and he proceeds to behead their leader, which makes him a hero across known space, even as far as the fleet of ships commanded by the Nazi-esque Tommy Tomorrow, on a search for immortality, long promised. Purvis's perceived heroism gets the Star Rovers an assignment off world that looks promising in the legend of a "new messiah."

Read More →

1 7 8 9 10 11